Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

​If you are thinking of immigrating to Canada, or have immigrated to Canada, you may have questions about how your credentials, skills, and experiences will transfer to dietetics practice in Canada.

In this section, you will find frequently asked questions about becoming, and working as a dietitian in Canada. 

Becoming a Dietitian

In order to use the titles "Dietitian," "Registered Dietitian (R.D.)," or "Professional Dietitian (P.Dt/Dt.P)" in Canada, you must be assessed for registration with a provincial dietetic regulatory body (also referred to as being “licensed”, “holding a Certificate of Registration with” or “being a member of” a provincial dietetic regulatory body).

Provincial dietetic regulatory bodies are responsible for protecting the public from harm by ensuring that dietitians practice safely, ethically, and effectively. Only individuals who are registered (or licensed) with a provincial regulatory body can call themselves a dietitian. The titles "Dietitian," "Registered Dietitian (R.D.)," and "Professional Dietitian (P.Dt/Dt.P)" are protected by law in all provinces in Canada.1

There are 10 provincial dietetic regulatory bodies in Canada. Each provincial dietetic regulatory body determines its own assessment process, so it is important to contact the province that you would like to work in for more information.

Your application to a provincial dietetic regulatory body will include an assessment of your credentials (i.e. your academic preparation and practical training) against the minimum standards for entry into the profession. Other criteria, such as eligibility to work in Canada and good character and conduct will also typically be assessed. 

Some provincial dietetic regulatory bodies may also require you to complete an in-person assessment of competency in dietetics as part of the assessment process.

Click on one of the links below to contact the provincial dietetic regulatory body with which you would like to apply for registration.

 

1 Dietitians of Canada. (2016). Difference between Dietitian and Nutritionist. Retrieved April 4, 2015 from http://www.dietitians.ca/Your-Health/Find-A-Dietitian/Difference-Between-Dietitian-and-Nutritionist.aspx

Readiness for an assessment by a provincial dietetic regulatory body depends on a few factors including:

  • Whether you have completed the required academic preparation and practical training in dietetics.
  • Whether you have compiled all of the documents that you need for your application. An assessment may not be able to be completed without all required documents.
  • Whether you meet the minimum required English or French language proficiency levels set by the provincial dietetic regulatory body. If not, it is recommended that you successfully complete language training and increase your proficiency level in one of the official languages in Canada (i.e. English or French) before applying for an assessment by a provincial dietetic regulatory body.

Each provincial dietetic regulatory body determines its own assessment process, so it is important to contact the province that you would like to work in for more information on your readiness to be assessed for registration.  

Completing “My Self-Assessment” on this website may help provide you with an overview of how your knowledge, skills, and judgments compare to the standards for dietetics practice in Canada.

Click on the link below that best describes the academic preparation and practical training related to dietetics you have completed outside of Canada:

I have completed academic preparation and practical training related to dietetics

If you have completed academic preparation and practical training related to dietetics outside of Canada, the provincial dietetic regulatory body you apply to will conduct an assessment to determine whether you have met the criteria for registration in that province.

What happens after the assessment?

After your assessment by a provincial dietetic regulatory body, it is common to be required to complete some additional academic coursework and/or practical training in dietetics in Canada to meet the minimum standards for registration.  It is important to be prepared for this, as it takes time and money to fulfill these requirements.  As well, admission to academic coursework or practical training in dietetics in Canada is competitive, and there is no guarantee of being able to access either.

There are some supports and programs in Canada, which aim to orient you to the dietetics profession and provide opportunities for you to fulfill some coursework and/or practical training requirements in dietetics.  These supports and programs typically have eligibility criteria. It’s important to review their websites and call them directly as needed. See "Are there education and training options available to internationally educated dietitians?" below.

What happens once I meet all of the academic coursework and/or practical training requirements?

After you have met all of the academic coursework and/or practical training requirements, as well as other eligibility criteria for registration as determined by a provincial dietetics regulatory body (e.g. language proficiency, good character and conduct etc.), you will be eligible to write the Canadian Dietetic Registration Examination (CDRE). The CDRE is the national dietetics registration examination and is the final step in the registration process for all provinces (except in Quebec).  

You may be permitted to have temporary registration to practice dietetics while you wait to write the CDRE. 

The CDRE is held two times per year (May and November).  The exam is written on a computer and consists of multiple choice questions.  Read more about the CDRE.

I have completed academic preparation, but NOT practical training related to dietetics

If you do not have any practical training or work experience in dietetics, you will need to successfully complete supervised practical training in dietetics in Canada (or its substantial equivalence). There are two main ways to gain this experience in Canada:

  1. Complete an Undergraduate Degree, in which the practical training is integrated
  2. Complete a Master’s Program, in which the practical training is integrated
Dietitians of Canada provides detailed information about each of these options.

 

You may be required to complete an assessment of your academic preparation to determine your eligibility to apply to a specific dietetics education program. An assessment may show that you need to complete some additional coursework before you are able to apply for practical training. Be sure to review the eligibility criteria and application details on the university’s site and contact the program if you have questions.

Note that accessing supervised practical training in dietetics in Canada is very competitive because training opportunities are limited.

Some provincial dietetic regulatory bodies may also allow independently coordinated practical training, based on the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice. This type of process means that you independently arrange supervised placements and learning experiences with qualified professionals (and advisors, as relevant). Contact the provincial dietetic regulatory body with which you would like to register for more information.

I have NOT completed academic preparation or practical training related to dietetics

If you have not completed academic preparation or practical training related to dietetics, but have worked in the nutrition field outside of Canada, you will need to complete the required academic preparation and practical training.

Academic preparation:

You will need to complete one of the accredited education programs in food and nutrition available across Canada.

Some of these programs include supervised practical training in dietetics (otherwise known as practicum placements) integrated as a part of the degree. Other programs fulfill academic preparation requirements only, and practical training in dietetics is completed after graduation. Practical training is completed either through an accredited post-degree dietetic internship program or a Master’s program, which includes practicum placements in dietetics. These programs are competitive and require an application process. For example, less than half of applicants to post-degree dietetic internships in Canada secure a position.1

Practical training:

Even with work experience in the nutrition field, you may need to complete additional supervised practical training as determined by a provincial dietetic regulatory body. Contact the dietetic regulatory body in the province you wish to work for more information.


1 Dietitians of Canada. (2015). Internship selection process. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.dietitians.ca/Become-a-Dietitian/Internships-Practicum-Programs/DC-Internship-Selection-Process.aspx

 

As part of your assessment by a provincial dietetic regulatory body, you will be asked to submit documentation of your credentials (i.e. your academic preparation and practical training) and experience.

It is highly recommended that you contact the relevant provincial dietetic regulatory body about required documentation for your assessment before leaving for Canada, if possible. Some provincial dietetic regulatory bodies may allow you to prepare and submit your application and documentation while you are still living internationally.

Each provincial dietetic regulatory body determines its own assessment process, so it is important to carefully follow instructions for the documentation required for the province that you would like to work in.

Below are some examples of documentation that you may need for your application to a provincial dietetics regulatory body (depending on the province):

Degree parchment(s)

This is the document that proves you graduated from the university. It has the name of the university that you attended and graduated from, the university seal, the name of the degree you received, your name, and the date of your graduation.

Official academic transcript(s)

Academic transcripts list the names of the courses you took at university, when you took the courses, and the grades that you received.

Course descriptions or course syllabi

Course descriptions are often short paragraphs describing what students learn in a course in a particular academic year. These are often found on university websites or university calendars.

Course syllabi (i.e. course outlines) are more detailed outlines of the course content, typically distributed to students who have already enrolled in a class. They expand on the course description, and often include specific topics that will be covered and reading lists. They also identify the ways learning will be assessed (e.g. through exams, assignments etc.).

Continuing education/professional development

If you have participated in dietetics-related conferences, workshops or other activities that have helped you remain current in your knowledge and/or skills, bring documentation that provides evidence of this participation.

Dietetics-related employment reference letters

If you have been employed in dietetics-related work, bring official and signed letters of reference from your employer, which verify the dates that you were employed by the organization, the scope of your responsibilities, and comments on the quality of your work. Contact information for the employer should also be included in the letter.

Documentation of supervised practical training in dietetics

This may involve detailed descriptions of the range of learning activities that you completed during your practical training, the dates and length of your training, how learning or competency was assessed, the qualifications of your supervisors etc.

English or French language proficiency test scores

Contact the relevant provincial dietetic regulatory body to learn about their minimum language proficiency requirements and what proficiency tests they accept as proof of English or French language proficiency.

These documents may also be important if you intend to apply to a bridging program/process, a certificate program, or for your job search.

Again, these are examples of documents that may be required and may not be an exhaustive list. Contact the provincial dietetic regulatory body and relevant dietetics education programs and bridging programs/processes for exact requirements for documents and how documents should be provided.

The time it takes to register as a dietitian in Canada depends on many things, including the length of time it takes you to complete the application and assessment process with a provincial dietetic regulatory body.

It also depends on the outcomes of the assessment process, which identifies whether or not you meet the minimum standards for entry to the profession or require further academic coursework and/or practical training.  

The time to complete academic coursework and/or practical training requirements varies based on:

  • How many courses you are required to complete, if any.
  • The sequence or timeframe the courses are offered in. For example, do you have to wait for a number of months before the course starts?  Are you required to take a prerequisite course before enrolling in an upper-level course?
  • The length of time it takes you to secure required practical training in dietetics, as relevant. For example, application deadlines for bridging programs/processes, certificate programs or accredited Masters programs can be many months before the program starts. They are also very competitive to access.
  • How many weeks of practical training in dietetics you require.

Yes. There are currently three education and practical training options in Canada for internationally educated dietitians. 

Bridging programs and processes

Bridging programs or processes in Canada are learning opportunities structured to support internationally educated dietitians in transitioning their international dietetics practice to Canadian dietetics practice. They are specifically designed to provide opportunities to meet some dietetic registration requirements. There are two bridging programs/processes in Canada:

Alberta

Alberta Internationally Educated Dietitian Bridging Program offered by the University of Alberta

Nova Scotia

Bridging Process for Internationally Educated Dietitians offered by Mount Saint Vincent Department of Applied Human Nutrition in collaboration with the Nova Scotia Dietetic Association

Certificate program

The Certificate in Preparation for Practice in Canada for Internationally Educated Professionals in Nutrition at Ryerson University in Ontario is designed to provide internationally educated professionals in nutrition (IEPNs) with a Canadian university certificate to supplement their international credential(s), enabling enhanced opportunities for employment.

The certificate is also designed to assist IEPNs to be academically prepared for practice-based training, a required component to become a Registered Dietitian (RD) in Ontario. Graduates from this certificate will have demonstrated entry level academic competencies in dietetics, as defined by the Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice’s (PDEP’s) Integrated Competencies in Dietetic Education and Practice (ICDEP).

These programs have their own eligibility criteria and may have limited enrollment, so it is important to contact them directly.

If you are registered as a dietitian in one province, and you continue to be a member of good standing with that provincial dietetic regulatory body, then you can apply for your dietetics license in another province “without having to undergo significant additional training, examination, or assessment.”1

Contact the dietetic regulatory body in the province you would like to move to for specific details on your situation.


1 Internal Trade Secretariat. (n.d). Agreement on internal trade. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.ait-aci.ca/labour-mobility/#01

Academic preparation and practical training in Canada for dietitians involves two key steps:1

  1. Completion of a university academic program in food and nutrition that has been accredited by the Partnership on Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP), or its substantial equivalence; and
  2. Supervised practical training in dietetics, based on the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice. This training may be a part of an undergraduate program, integrated into a graduate (i.e. Masters) program, or may be a post-degree dietetics internship.

Dietitians of Canada describes dietetics academic preparation and practical training pathways in Canada in detail.

Depending on the university academic program and practical training route, it takes approximately 4-6 years for someone to complete their education and training in dietetics on a full-time basis (with the exception of time off during the summer months in some cases).

Accessing practical training in dietetics can be very competitive in Canada as training spaces are limited. Less than half of applicants to post-degree dietetic internships in Canada secure a position. 2


1 Dietitians of Canada. (2015). Become a dietitian. Education. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.dietitians.ca/Become-a-Dietitian/Education.aspx

2 Dietitians of Canada. (2015). Internship selection process. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.dietitians.ca/Become-a-Dietitian/Internships-Practicum-Programs/DC-Internship-Selection-Process.aspx


Working as a Dietitian

In Canada, being registered as a dietitian:

  • Opens up job opportunities . Many organizations limit eligibility for some jobs to Registered Dietitians such as dietitian jobs in hospitals, Long-Term Care homes, public health departments etc.
  • Gives you the opportunity to access resources , professional networks, and other services, which can support your work and keep you current in the profession.
  • Assures the public that you are practicing safely, ethically and effectively.

The title of “Dietitian” or “Registered Dietitian” is protected by law in all provinces in Canada. This means that only individuals who are registered (or licensed) with a provincial regulatory college can call themselves a “dietitian”.

The title “nutritionist” is not protected by law in most provinces. This means that anybody in these provinces may call themselves a nutritionist. The exceptions are the provinces of Alberta1, Quebec2 and Nova Scotia3 – only individuals licensed with the dietetics regulatory body in these provinces may call themselves nutritionists.

All dietitians can call themselves nutritionists. In fact, some dietitians also use this as their job title. But not all people that call themselves “nutritionists” can call themselves dietitians.

This video describes the use of the dietitian title in British Columbia, but can applied to other provinces in Canada.


1 College of Dietitians of Alberta. (2010). How do I know my dietitian in registered? Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://collegeofdietitians.ab.ca/public/how-do-i-know-my-dietitian-is-registered/

2 Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec. (2015). Deux titres, une profession. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://opdq.org/qui-sommes-nous/deux-titres-une-profession/

3 The Nova Scotia Dietetic Association. (n.d.). What is the difference between a dietitian and a nutritionist? Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.nsdassoc.ca/

Dietetics is a very broad profession in Canada. Dietitians work in many different settings and organizations in Canada. Some examples include:

  • Hospitals
  • Long-Term Care homes
  • Community Health Centres or Organizations
  • Public Health Agencies
  • Food or Agriculture Groups
  • Food Industry
  • Retail Grocery Stores
  • Government
  • Health Clinics
  • Fitness and Recreation Centres
  • Rehabilitation Centres
  • Non-Governmental Organizations
  • Colleges or Universities
  • Private Practice

In these settings, dietitians may be doing one-to-one counselling, creating nutrition care plans, developing nutrition policies, facilitating group nutrition education sessions, designing large scale population health initiatives, writing nutrition blogs, coordinating community kitchens, working with the media, developing institutional menus, writing research-based newsletters for health professionals, and much more!

Learn more about the careers of dietitians in Canada by visiting the following links:

Visit Explore Dietetics Practice in Canada on this website for more information about the role of a dietitian in Nutrition Care, Population and Public Health, and Food Service Management.

It is predicted that the demand for dietitians will be stable or grow based on nutrition trends and the nutrition-related needs of an aging population in Canada. Currently, the unemployment rate for dietitians in many provinces is very low.1

Opportunities for dietitian’s jobs can shift due to the supply and demand for dietitians. For example, some large urban centres may have a greater total number of job positions for dietitians as compared to other areas, but also more dietitians competing for those jobs. Some rural or remote areas may have a smaller number of dietitian positions compared to urban areas, but might also have a more limited supply of dietitians, in which case competition for these positions is minimized.

The greater flexibility you have in terms of the type (e.g. setting or focus), structure (e.g. contract versus permanent), and geographic location of job, the better it may be for job opportunities. For your first dietitian job in Canada, it is common to start with a contract position (i.e. not permanent).

Some ways to keep updated on job opportunities for dietitians include:

  • Registering for job alerts for dietitians through common employment sites (e.g. Workopolis, Charity Village) and
  • Contacting education and practical training options available to internationally educated dietitians (e.g. bridging programs/processes and certificate programs described above) and speaking with dietitians working in Canada.

1 Dietitians of Canada. (2009). Workforce analysis of dietitians in Alberta. Retrieved November 15, 2015 from http://www.dietitians.ca/Member/Resources-from-A-Z/Health-Human-Resources/Workforce-Analysis-of-Dietitians-in-Alberta.aspx; Government of Canada. (2013). Job bank. Dietitians and nutritionists. Retrieved November 15, 2015 from http://www.jobbank.gc.ca/report-eng.do?area=9219&lang=eng&noc=3132&action=final®ionKeyword=vancouver&s=1&source=2&titleKeyword=registered+dietitian+R#report_tabs_container2; Government of Canada. Job Futures Quebec. (2014). Dietitians and nutritionists. Retrieved from http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/qc/job_futures/statistics/3132.shtml;

 

If a dietitian is employed by an organization, who he or she reports to will differ based on the organizational setting and the specific job he or she has.

For example, a dietitian could report to another dietitian or other health professional (e.g. nurse, social worker, physiotherapist) who is a program manager. A dietitian could also be directly supervised by someone with a background in food service management, business administration, public administration, research, or education.

Dietitians may be their own boss if they own a personal business (e.g. private practice).

The average salary that dietitians make in Canada depends on a variety of factors including:

  • The setting in which they work
  • Where in Canada they work (geographically)
  • The number of hours per week they work
  • The number of years of experience they have
  • The number of years that they have worked for a particular organization
  • Whether or not they have graduate-level academic credentials

In general, a dietitian entering the profession in Canada may make approximately $50,000-$70,000/year for full-time employment.1


1 Dietitians of Canada. (2009). Workforce analysis of dietitians in Alberta. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.dietitians.ca/Member/Resources-from-A-Z/Health-Human-Resources/Workforce-Analysis-of-Dietitians-in-Alberta.aspx; Government of Canada. (2013). Job bank. Dietitians and nutritionists. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.jobbank.gc.ca/report-eng.do?area=9219&lang=eng&noc=3132&action=final®ionKeyword=vancouver&s=1&source=2&titleKeyword=registered+dietitian+R#report_tabs_container2; Province of British Columbia. (2015). Labour market navigator. Retrieved October 30, 105 from http://www.workbc.ca/Navigator/occupations/3132; Government of Canada. Job Futures Quebec. (2014). Dietitians and nutritionists. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/qc/job_futures/statistics/3132.shtml;

In Canada, dietitians have access to many services that support them in staying current in both knowledge and skill, and in navigating difficult issues in their jobs. Below are some examples, although not exhaustive.

Provincial Dietetic Regulatory Bodies

Provincial dietetic regulatory bodies offer information and other resources that support dietitians in practicing safely, effectively and ethically. Many of these are available online. Visit the website of the relevant provincial dietetics regulatory body for more information.

Website links

Dietitians of Canada

Dietitians of Canada (DC), the national member-based professional association, advocates for issues of importance to dietitians. DC also offers many learning and networking opportunities for dietitians, and provides resources to support practice. There is a cost for membership, and some services require additional fees. It is voluntary for dietitians to join DC.

Website links

Practice-Based Evidence in Nutrition (PEN) an evidence-based database for food, nutrition and dietetic practice
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
DC Learning on Demand modules and courses
DC annual conference
DC special interest networks
DC Registered Dietitian bloggers

Governmental & non-governmental organizations & associations

Many government and special interest organizations offer resources, research updates, professional development opportunities (including webinars, which may be accessible internationally), policy information, and other relevant material for dietetics practice. Some examples of national organizations that dietitians may find useful include the following.

Website links

Canadian Cancer Society
Canadian Diabetes Association
Canadian Nutrition Society
Crohn’s & Colitis Canada
Food Allergy Canada
Health Canada
Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada
Osteoporosis Canada
Public Health Agency of Canada

Many provincial organizations also offer relevant support for dietetics practice.

Employer/organizational supports

Many employers of dietitians support ongoing continuing education by providing funding or approving time for professional development, paying for subscription-based scholarly journals, or directly offering workshops or other learning opportunities for staff.

Website links

See Dietitians of Canada links above.

Professional peer networks

Being connected to a professional network of dietetics colleagues is valuable in sharing information, resources, and expertise. Many dietitians in Canada belong to informal or formal networking groups built, for example, through educational experiences (e.g. bridging programs/processes and certificate programs for internationally educated dietitians) and common employment situations (e.g. dietitians working in Long-Term Care in a particular province).

Dietitians may also follow trusted colleagues on social media to keep updated on food and nutrition trends and news, and to pick up practical ideas that could be integrated into practice.

Website links

See Dietitians of Canada links above.

Research databases and open access journals/articles

As an evidence-informed profession in Canada, scholarly research supports the work that dietitians do. Literature searches can be done using online databases or those available through university library systems. Some scholarly journals provide free access (also known as open access) to select articles; other articles can be accessed for a fee. Some provinces provide free access to specific journals for dietitians.

Website links

PubMed (online database)
Google Scholar (online database)

Canada’s healthcare system provides healthcare to residents mostly free of charge. The healthcare system in Canada is mainly funded by governments, with private payers (e.g. private insurers and individual users) covering about one third of the costs.1

Healthcare is delivered in various settings in Canada, for example, primary healthcare clinics, community health organizations, hospitals, rehabilitation centres, Long-Term Care homes, homecare agencies etc. Dietitians’ services may be accessed at no cost to clients in some healthcare environments (e.g. hospitals), whereas they may be paid for privately in others.

The healthcare system (and dietetics practice) in Canada aims to provide services which are client-centred. This influences how the healthcare system operates. Many values underlie client-centred practice.2

Review the information below to learn about the values of the Canadian healthcare system and their relevancy to dietetics practice.

Client as a collaborating partner

Clients are experts in their own lives and have a right to engage as a partner in their care.

Relevancy to Dietetics Practice
Dietitians have the responsibility to create opportunities for clients to share their perspectives and values, feel that these perspectives and values are respected, ask questions, and make decisions about their health.

Client autonomy and choice

Clients have the right to make decisions about their health and the services they receive, without pressure.

Relevancy to Dietetics Practice
Dietitians should focus on clients’ needs and goals, and support clients in making informed decisions by providing all possible options and related information in an effective way.

Privacy and confidentiality3

Privacy and confidentiality are related, but different concepts. Together, they refer to what information is collected from a client and how the privacy of that information is protected. In the Canadian context, “personal health information belongs to the client, not the practitioner.” (College of Dietitians of Ontario, 2015, p. 54).4

Relevancy to Dietetics Practice
Dietitians act as custodians (trustees or keepers) of personal health information for the benefit of the client.

There are laws across the country related to privacy that dietitians need to follow. For example, any personal information that a dietitian collects from a client must be purposeful and a dietitian must have the authority to collect it (for example, a client has provided consent for its collection and use). There are also laws governing how confidential information is safeguarded (kept safe).

Equity and universal access5

Clients should be able to access medically necessary healthcare services based on need, regardless of economic status, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, age, gender, geographic location, marital status, ethnic background, skin colour, or education level.6

Relevancy to Dietetics Practice
Dietitians aim to provide and advocate for services that are accessible, equitably distributed, and prioritized based on need.

Accountability and transparency7

Priority is placed on the responsible use of resources and measuring the inputs, outcomes and effectiveness of services provided (also referred to as evidence-informed or evidence-based practice). Value is placed on honesty, clearly sharing information about decision-making processes and reasons for decisions with stakeholders, as well as accepting responsibility for one’s (or one’s organization’s) actions.8

Relevancy to Dietetics Practice
Dietetics practice is evidence-informed or evidence-based. This means dietitians rely on many different types and sources of evidence to make decisions and to support clients in making decisions.

For example, evidence may include research findings described in scholarly journals, evaluation data, client experiences, promising practices or success stories from the field, among others.

Dietitians must be able to explain and justify decisions and actions, and accept accountability for both. They must be able to generate evidence related to their work. For example, by evaluating and reporting on program outcomes.

Quality of healthcare9

Value is placed on continually striving for the best possible practices and outcomes in healthcare using available resources.

Relevancy to Dietetics Practice
Dietitians are responsible for integrating current knowledge from the scientific community and other evidence sources.

Value is placed on continuous quality improvement of healthcare services, which means dietitians contribute to evaluations related to their practice, and share observations and ideas for service improvements.

Continuity of care10

Services should feel connected and coherent, and be responsive to client needs. With the client’s consent, information should be shared about the client’s medical condition, values, preferences, and social context, and complementary care plans across multiple healthcare providers. There should be relationship continuity with healthcare providers (e.g. a client sees one dietitian instead of seeing a different dietitian every time they come to a clinic), where possible, and clients should be linked to future care as needed.

Relevancy to Dietetics Practice
Continuity of care means dietitians are responsible for communicating and collaborating effectively within an interprofessional healthcare team.

To learn more about Canada’s healthcare system, consider:


1 Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2011). Health care cost drivers: the facts. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from https://secure.cihi.ca/free_products/health_care_cost_drivers_the_facts_en.pdf

2 College of Dietitians of Ontario. (2013). From the client’s perspective. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.collegeofdietitians.org/Resources/Client-Centred-Services/Client-Centred/ClientPerspective.aspx

3 College of Dietitians of Ontario. (2015). Jurisprudence handbook for dietitians in Ontario (Web ed.). Retrieved October 30, 2015 from https://www.collegeofdietitians.org/Resources/Publications-CDO/Jurisprudence-Handbook-for-Dietitians-in-Ontario-(.aspx

4 College of Dietitians of Ontario. (2015). Jurisprudence handbook for dietitians in Ontario (Web ed.). Retrieved October 30, 2015 from https://www.collegeofdietitians.org/Resources/Publications-CDO/Jurisprudence-Handbook-for-Dietitians-in-Ontario-(.aspx

5 Romanow, R. (2002). Building on values. The future of health care in Canada. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.cbc.ca/healthcare/final_report.pdf; College of Dietitians of Ontario. (2013). From the client’s perspective. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.collegeofdietitians.org/Resources/Client-Centred-Services/Client-Centred/ClientPerspective.aspx

6 Romanow, R. (2002). Building on values. The future of health care in Canada. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.cbc.ca/healthcare/final_report.pdf; College of Dietitians of Ontario. (2013). From the client’s perspective. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.collegeofdietitians.org/Resources/Client-Centred-Services/Client-Centred/ClientPerspective.aspx

7 Romanow, R. (2002). Building on values. The future of health care in Canada. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.cbc.ca/healthcare/final_report.pdf

8 O’Hagan, J. & Persaud, D. (2009). Creating a culture of accountability in health care. The Health Care Manager, 28(2), 124-133. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.nursingcenter.com/static?pageid=935642

9 Health Quality Ontario. Government of Ontario. About us. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from http://www.hqontario.ca/About-Us/Our-Mandate

10 Haggerty, J., Reid, R., Freeman, G., Starfield, B., Adair, C., & McKendry, R. (2003). Continuity of care: a multidisciplinary review. British Medical Journal, 327 (7425), 1219-1221. Retrieved October 30, 2015 from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC274066/;

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